Postcard Panda April 2016 Report

New to this series? Checkout the first report for background info on Postcard Panda.

Overall Stats

 March 2016April 2016
% Change
Revenue$185.00$258.0839.50%
Total Expenses-$158.14-$227.0643.58%
Profit$26.86$31.0215.48%

You’ll see details below, but the profit didn’t grow linearly with revenue because I’m taking left over profits and experimenting with different growth strategies. That means the metric I’m looking to increase the most is revenue, with the caveat that I never want to see the profit column in the red for any given month.

Expenses Breakdown

 March 2016April 2016% Change
Kite.ly$110$16045.45%
Hosting (Heroku)$7.00$7.000%
Advertising$0$6.36N/A
Stripe$31.68$46.1545.67%
S3 + Cloudfront$7.47$7.551.07%
Refunds$1.990-100%

USA App Store Stats

 March 2016April 2016% Change
Guest Orders2521-16.00%
Logged In Orders6310058.73%
Total Orders8812137.50%
Signups who placed an order303930.00%
Downloads1651724.24%
Reviews02N/A

I’ve made a change to the signups column from last month. Instead of just signups, I’ve changed the row to ‘signups created in the last month, who also placed an order’. I actually don’t know whether a user should be counted in the USA or UK column until they purchase a postcard, after which I know what currency the app charged them in. The total number of signups across all app stores went from 47 to 61, but that’s a useless number.

UK App Store Stats

 April 2016
Guest Orders1
Logged In Orders6
Total Orders7
Signups who placed an order1
Downloads6
Reviews0

This was the first month that Postcard Panda was available in the UK. If it weren’t for the one user who signed up and ordered 6 cards, this would look much worse (as it stands, it still isn’t great). I’m hoping to hit 100 downloads in the UK in the month of May.

What went right

  • Revenue saw good growth over the March numbers
  • I actually looked at my amazon web services bill and discovered that I had an elastic IP instance running for an unknown length of time. Next month I’ll save $3!
  • I launched in the UK, which took a fair amount of work to get the app and the server to accept a new currency. Numbers weren’t great, but the foundation has been created to explore new countries.
  • I got 2 five star reviews in the US app store
  • Refunds dropped to zero, and support inquiries were fairly low
  • The March cohort behaved strongly (see below)

What went wrong

  • I spent $6.36 on a FB ad that brought in ~900 impressions and 0 installs. Total fail on this one, but there is so many ways it could have gone wrong that I don’t have a good handle on how to improve.
  • After getting 2 positive reviews in the USA app store, I decided to hold on new releases to see if I could collect enough good reviews for the star rating to show up when people are browsing the app store. Unfortunately, this means that for the last half of April I didn’t release any new updates, which generally results in a fairly big revenue day afterwards. This one’s a wash for now.

The March cohort

Kristen commented last month that it would be interesting to see how different cohorts behaved over time. For the month of April, 13 users who signed up in March ordered 29 postcards collectively in April. That means that 43% of signups from March ordered a postcard in both March and April, which is better than I expected (hooray power users!). The math also shows that the March cohort of users ordered more postcards per user (2.23) than new signups who ordered a postcard in April (1.82).

Goals

My primary focus in May is going to be creating systems to organically (read free) grow Postcard Panda. Mandy (and Kristen) have both suggested that I add a ‘sent with Postcard Panda’ image to the back of the postcard, and I think that’s a great start.

A secondary focus will be to simply get more downloads in the UK. Not entirely sure my plan of attack on that yet, but I do want to see if Postcard Panda can be more profitable outside the US market.

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1 Comment

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  1. Wow, 43% is great! You might need to start thinking about a customer loyalty program if they keep it up 🙂

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